Happy Anniversary to US Oil sands and USO Utah bankrupt 2 years ago today.

We held a party this morning with a new banner, some music and announcements about the bankruptcy of USOS in 2017.

Now called USO Utah, the inactive mine site and factory has reduced it’s leasehold considerably. Having cleared the bankruptcy courts and restructured USO Utah has been given a clean bill of credit and is polishing the useless factory to feed the real golden goose: foolish investors, creditors and the tax payers of Utah!  

We arrived early to greet workers and let them know about the anniversary and the scam.

Here is a list of creditors who got screwed in 2017.

USO Utah is seeking investors

Do Not Be Fooled USO Utah is a SCAM!

 

 

 

 

Change SITLA

SITLA is destroying Utah’s pristine wilderness and providing a paltry 2% of the yearly budget. 

Utah spends $4.02 billion dollars per year on k thru 12 public education.

Source. https://ballotpedia.org/Public_education_in_Utah

In 2019 $82.66 million in (SITLA) school land trust funds distributed throughout schools in Utah this year.

Source: https://www.standard.net/news/education/utah-parents-encouraged-to-join-school-community-councils-influence-how/article_b5b4f319-baaf-54a7-85b9-7822908e82c2.html

These numbers and math show SITLA provides 2% ( 0.02056196479 ) of public school funds.  

I won’t expound on the wrongful damage SITLA does to the potential for a livible future for the schoolchildren in Utah … that is well documented elsewhere … see for ex. www.tarsandsresist.org
 

SITLA is very controversial for producing just 2%! 

How do they do it?  SITLA (and I mean our governor Dirty Herrbert and the Legislature) hypes the puny SITLA 2% by requiring school parents to be elected to local councils for 2 year terms to decide how to spend the 2% within strict brackets. (See story above)

A bureaucracy has been created just to serve these councils. 

The councils themselves become vested in the SITLA 2%. 

All this convolution is in service to perpetuating SITLA, the nefarious enterprise overseen by Dirty Herbert’s hand picked board. 

Let’s all support the students who are working to CHANGE SITLA.

Regards,

~Lionel for Utah Tar Sands Resistance

USOS (a tarsand stripmine) is spreading dangerous synthetic vitreous fibers on School Trust Lands at PR Springs, Utah.

Notice of Uncontrolled Air and Water Pollution in Uintah County, Utah and  Complaint made by UTSR.

       Please take notice and immediate corrective action regarding the Synthetic Vitreous Fibers (Fiberglass) being dispersed without control into the air and subsequently deposited onto the lands and into the waters of the Uncompahgre reservation in Uintah County, Utah.


  The source of the fiberglass is the deteriorating exterior insulation on a water tank serving the tar sand strip mine Police Substation of Agent Ronald C. Barton, Utah Attorney General’s Office, for SITLA, located adjacent to the USOS stripmine and factory on Seep Ridge Road, in Uintah County, Utah.

BACKGROUND:

The tank and uncontrolled dispersing fiberglass is apparently owned by USO (Utah) LLC, a private Delaware corporation based in Canada.

The tank is or was used in a bonded mine plan, M0470090, which was approved by Utah Division of Oil, Gas & Mining.

The tank is on land leased to USO (Utah) LLC., by the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA), and is located in Uintah County immediately west of Seep Ridge Road, just south of mile marker one.

  The US Government granted the impacted lands to the Uncompahgre Utes on January 5, 1882 by an executive order of President Chester A. Arthur, later the US Government took control of the land from the Ute Tribe through the allotment process. The Uncompahgre reservation boundaries were not diminished and the Ute nation retains jurisdiction on the subject lands.

SITLA subsequently obtained title to these lands in trade with the US Government.

The USO tarsand stripmine went into bankruptcy a couple years ago and the place shuttered up. Recently some activity is occurring. Photos of the deteriorating water tank at the tarsand stripmine show fiberglass entering the environment in large pieces and small and show the water tank’s connection to Attorney General’s Police Substation. A sample of the fiberglass has been collected as indicated.

The Photos are linked HERE: 

All of these photos accurately depict the conditions at this site in July 2019

The photos indicate recent activity at the USO stripmine factory site where a gas powered electric generator was placed on and near the water tank dispersing fiberglass in mid July 2019.

How can fiberglass affect my health?

Larger fibers have been found to cause skin, eye and upper respiratory tract irritation. There are other possible health effects:

A rash can appear when the fibers become embedded in the outer layer of the skin. No long-term health effects should occur from touching fiberglass. Eyes may become red and irritated after exposure to fiberglass. Soreness in the nose and throat can result when fibers are inhaled. Asthma and bronchitis can be aggravated by exposure to fiberglass. Temporary stomach irritation may occur if fibers are swallowed. 

SOURCE: http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/factsheets/fiberglass.htm

What happens to synthetic vitreous fibers when they enter the environment? 

Synthetic vitreous fibers do not evaporate into air or dissolve in water. They are generally not broken down to other compounds in the environment and will remain virtually unchanged over long periods. 

  Eventually, synthetic vitreous fibers will be broken down if the water or soil is very acidic or very alkaline. Fibers can enter the air, water, and soil from the manufacture, use, and disposal of synthetic vitreous fiber-containing materials. Fibers with small diameters become airborne more easily than thick fibers, and can be transported by wind for longer distances. Synthetic vitreous fibers are not likely to move through soil.

SOURCE: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 2004.

 

American Badger sighting today

american badger

This morning around 9:30 am I noticed an animal moving across the meadow. It looked like a large cat or small dog from afar so I grabbed a camera and ran over to the meadow. The badger ran up the dirt road and I got a few pics!

A one point it turned toward me and puffed up and growled. It was grunting and hissing as it ran off. Another amazing animal flourishing on the Tavaputs Plateau in the book-cliffs.

The badger has an interesting quality called “Embryonic diapause” or delayed implantation. This means the embryonic blastocyst does not immediately implant in the uterus after sexual reproduction.

Nature is wise.

Public scoping begins on Uinta Basin Railway

The Uinta basin railway will be devastating to the planet and the people. 

Submit a written comment

OEA will accept public scoping comments through September 3rd 2019. 

The easiest way to submit your written comments is via the “Submit Comments” tab at http://www.uintabasinrailwayeis.com/.

This was written by the center for Biological diversity:

Uinta Basin Railway Comment Writing Guide

Background:

  • The proposed Uinta Basin Railway oil train would increase production of oil from the Uinta Basin by between 225,000 and 350,000 barrels of oil per day. In a region that currently only produces around 80,000 barrels per day, this would represent a quadrupling of oil extraction, which would have dire consequences for air quality, public lands, water, and global warming. The construction and operation of the railway itself would also have major impacts. Three possible routes have been identified, but the 80-mile Indian Canyon route has been identified as the preferred option and is most likely to be constructed. At least $27.9 million in public funds have already been illegally dedicated to forward the project and the ultimate cost of the railway would be at least $1.2 billion. Maps and additional information can be found at: http://www.uintabasinrailwayeis.com/
    • Static maps of the three routes can be found in this document and if you have Google Earth, you can view the routes on an interactive map by opening these files.
  • For more background on the Uinta Basin Railway, check out this op-ed: https://www.sltrib.com/opinion/commentary/2018/12/23/commentary-cib-should/

Major Concerns:

  • Air pollution in the Uinta Basin has already reached dangerous levels due to oil and gas development. By quadrupling oil extraction in the region, the railway would exacerbate this problem, resulting in more asthma attacks and other harmful conditions that can lead to premature death.
  • The extraction and combustion of four times as much oil from the Uinta Basin would threaten our ability to avoid the most disastrous effects of climate change by staying under 1.5°C warming. 
  • Fossil fuel development requires large amounts of water. At a time when water security for the region is more tenuous than ever, increased oil development unleashed by the Uinta Basin Railway would threaten the region’s water supply.
  • The new development needed to create a fourfold increase in oil development in the Uinta Basin will result in major impacts to the region’s landscapes, including on public lands.
  • New oil train traffic will create increased inconvenience, air pollution, and risk of derailment in the communities through which the trains travel.
  • If the railway is constructed, but recoverable oil reserves in the Uinta Basin are exhausted before it is paid off, taxpayers could be left to cover the cost.
  • To date, there has been very little information about the Uinta Basin Railway provided to the public and little opportunity for public participation. The uncertainty around many details of the project is concerning and should be resolved before the project moves forward. 
  • Committing funds to constructing the Uinta Basin Railway is precluding efforts to transition away from boom-and-bust fossil fuel economies — which are susceptible to volatile global markets — and towards more stable, local, clean, sustainable, and just economies. 

How to Submit:

The easiest way to submit your written comments is via the “Submit Comments” tab at http://www.uintabasinrailwayeis.com/.

Public Scoping Meetings

OEA will hold six public scoping meetings in communities in the project area during the public comment period. The public scoping meetings will be held at the following locations on the dates listed.

  • Monday July 15, 2019, 3-5 p.m. at the Ute Tribal Auditorium, 910 South 7500 East, Fort Duchesne, Utah. Start Printed Page 28613
  • Tuesday July 16, 2019, 5-7 p.m. at the Moffat County Fairgrounds Pavilion, 640 E Victory Way, Craig, Colorado.
  • Wednesday July 17, 2019, 5-7 p.m. at the Carbon County Event Center, 450 S Fairgrounds Road, Price, Utah.
  • Thursday July 18, 2019, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Grace Event Center, 1024 W Highway 40, Roosevelt, Utah.
  • Thursday July 18, 2019, 5-7 p.m. at the Uintah Conference Center, 313 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah.
  • Friday July 19, 2019, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Radisson Hotel Salt Lake City Downtown, 215 West South Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Bicycles Not Tar Sands!

Coming up Sept 1-3, 2018 free event.
Join UTSR for an exciting adventure  on the “Road to Nowhere” in the beautiful book cliffs. Bicycles are not required and folks can travel along and meet up or mix and match portions of driving and riding.

For a total ride of approx 40 miles over 2 days we will travel on a smooth highway. Seep Ridge Road, with a small amount of gravel road travel at each evenings camp site. The entire ride will be highly scenic and nature filled save the mine sites.

Seep Ridge road was built at great tax payer expense after years of lobbying from tar sands and oil shale development companies. The 45 mile road cost a total of $86.5 million.  The road is of very high load standards and is actually a higher quality road than Utah hwy 40 however there is very little traffic or use of the road. It provides a very smooth traveling road for bicycles through an amazing scenic plateau known as the Eastern Tavaputs, the Bicycles Not Tar Sands bike ride is on the Tavaputs Plateau within Ute nation’s Uncompahgre reservation boundaries . Many of Utah’s politicians, SITLA, Uintah county leaders and the federal department of Energy have labeled this area an “energy sacrifice zone” and  repeatedly attempt to take this land from the Utes. We will end our 2nd day of the ride at Willow Creek overlook where we will camp overnight. Bring your bike this labor day weekend and join our bike ride.

For more information go here:

http://www.tarsandsresist.org/upcoming-events/

 

We’ve Moved Our Vigil to SITLA!

BREAKING: Utah Tar Sands Resistance has moved our protest vigil to SITLA, the School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, located in downtown Salt Lake City!

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That’s right, we rolled in with our water barrels, tents, and banners, and set up shop at high noon today.

Join us if you can. Bring food or coffee, and it will be a party.

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SITLA's dirty work banner

Read the press release:

Utah Tar Sands Resistance
Stages 24-Hour Vigil on Lawn of SITLA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 21, 2015

SALT LAKE CITY, UT: On October 21 at noon, members of Utah Tar Sands Resistance and supporters launched a 24-hour vigil in front of SITLA (School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration) in Salt Lake City. This summer and fall, beginning in mid-May, they have been holding an ongoing protest encampment in the Book Cliffs of eastern Utah, at the site where US Oil Sands is attempting to start the first commercial tar sands mine in the U.S. Now, they have brought their protest to the front doors of the agency responsible for leasing the lands, SITLA, located at 500 S/700 E, Salt Lake City.

The group chose to launch their vigil the day before SITLA’s next board meeting, which will take place at 9 a.m. on October 22. SITLA’s board is stacked with developers chosen by the governor, and its decisions to lease land for the world’s dirtiest energy sources—like tar sands and oil shale—stand in stark contrast to its mandate to never sacrifice short-term gains for the long-term wellbeing of Utah’s children.

In reality, SITLA contributes just 1–2% of the public schools’ budget. What do SITLA’s choices actually give the residents of Utah? The high rate of infant mortality in the Uintah Basin and the red air days in the Salt Lake Valley during which children and pregnant women are told to stay indoors, for starters. Human health will be jeopardized even more if the world’s dirtiest projects are allowed to take root in Utah. Along with decimated ecosystems, dwindling watersheds, and climate chaos, these realities show that SITLA’s choices are giving our children a toxic and frightening future, leaving them to cope with previous generations’ mistakes.

Jill Merritt, a mother of four and a grandmother, says, “SITLA’s choices put my grandchildren and future generations in grave danger, leaving them with a world torn apart by climate chaos, poisoned rivers, and toxic air. We call on SITLA to immediately rescind their leases for tar sands and oil shale, and start focusing on the long-term wellbeing of our children.”

Utah Tar Sands Resistance encourages all concerned members of the public to join them in standing up for a livable future. Their vigil is a family-friendly environment that they hope will serve as a public forum in which people can discuss their concerns about the management of public lands and resources. They will be recording stories on the site for a video project on this issue, and they invite kids, parents, and other members of the public to come share about their concerns for the environment and their love of Utah’s public lands.

Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse Party and Campout!

 

September 26-28, at the vigil site.

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Come watch and celebrate the blood moon lunar eclipse with us in one of the darkest places in the western states!

We’re staying up on a ridge, at the highest point on the East Tavaputs Plateau–an ideal place for moon gazing!

The blood moon/eclipse is on the night of the 27th/28th (Sunday). Come camp with us any time that weekend. We’ll be at the Vigil site by the gravel pile across from US Oil Sands’ worksite. Get directions at tarsandsresist.org/camp.

Bring warm gear in case of cold weather or rain. The weather has mostly been very pleasant lately, with rain here and there. We have dinner food we can prepare together, and please bring your own lunch and breakfast.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/905370756209534/

See you on the ridge soon!